Arizona Prescription Monitoring Program

The Arizona Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP), housed in the Arizona State Board of Pharmacy, collects data on all controlled substance prescriptions in Arizona (schedules II-V). This information assists healthcare providers in making better-informed care decisions when treating patients. The PMP also helps prevent the diversion and misuse of controlled substances at the provider, pharmacy, and patient levels. For more information about the PMP, please click here.

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Important EPCS Reminders:

A.R.S. §36-2525 addresses EPCS prescription requirements for schedule II opioid prescriptions in Arizona. This same statute addresses what pharmacists and prescribers may do when the EPCS software system is in a degraded “downtime status”.
The most frequently asked question involving EPCS prescribing is:

“Can I fill a written prescription for a schedule II opioid if the provider’s electronic prescribing system or my pharmacy management system is not operational?”

Answer:  Yes. Pursuant to A.R.S. §36-2525(D)(1), if the electronic prescribing system or a pharmacy management system is not operational, the pharmacist may dispense a prescription order that is written for a schedule II controlled substance that is an opioid. The pharmacist must maintain a record, for a period of time prescribed by the board, or when the electronic prescribing system or pharmacy management system is not operational.

Additional information regarding prescription orders:

A.R.S. §36-2525. Prescription orders; labels; packaging; definition

N. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, beginning January 1, 2020, each prescription order, except a prescription order under subsection F of this section, that is issued by a medical practitioner for a schedule II controlled substance that is an opioid shall be transmitted electronically to the dispensing pharmacy.  A medical practitioner is not in violation of this subsection:

1. During any time in which an established electronic prescribing system or a pharmacy management system is not operational or available in a timely manner. If the electronic prescribing system or a pharmacy management system is not operational or available, the medical practitioner may write a prescription order for a Schedule II controlled substance that is an opioid. The medical practitioner shall indicate on the written prescription order that the electronic prescribing system or pharmacy management system is not operational or available. The medical practitioner must maintain a record, for a period of time prescribed by the board, of when the electronic prescribing system or pharmacy management system is not operational or available in a timely manner.